Tag Archives: dry eyes

How Computer Or Mobile Brightness Affect Vision

16 Nov

Our world has been transformed with the arrival of computers and mobile phones. Thanks to technological advancements, we live in a world where everything is easily accessible, faster, cheaper and quicker. Unfortunately, all this advancement has come at a cost, our health. And vision-related ill-effects from computers and mobile devices must be guarded against. 

So what exactly are the ill-effects of computers and mobile phones on our eyes and our vision? Let us take the computer to start with. Computers, their screens to be more specific, are made up of thousands of tiny pixels that are constantly moving. Our eyes in turn are not naturally able to set focus on these constantly moving pixels, and hence we try to focus on an area behind the actual screen. Therefore, in order to work on a computer, our eyes need to keep on fluctuating focus between their natural point of focus and the pixels on the screen. And this tires the eyes and causes a lot of wear and tear.

 

As a result, we suffer from irritation, which may range from a number of things like headaches, dry eyes, blurred vision, problems in focusing and faulty color perception, to something as severe as glaucoma. How does one avoid this? One must reduce the intensity of the computer’s screen by attaching a filter or by getting an eye-friendly screen. Above all, one must try to reduce the amount of computer usage or take frequent breaks. 

Similarly with mobile phones too, the eyes suffer the most from extended usage. The electromagnetic waves that are emitted by a mobile phone can be extremely damaging to the eyes. It has been studied and well documented that these cell phone waves can have a damaging effect on the various parts of the eye, including the retina and the cornea. Moreover, they can cause cataract too.

 

That is just the fall out from the waves of the cell phone. The cell phone screen itself has its own pitfalls that are similar to the ill-effects caused by computer screens. Only in this case, the strain is of a different kind because cell phone screens are much smaller than computer screens. So not only are the eyes dealing with the pixels, but are inherently stressing to be able to view content on a tiny screen too. 

The solution again is reduced usage. There is nothing more effective than controlling usage to reduce and negate the effects. To say that we can now lead our lives without computers and mobile devices would be a fallacy. But at least we can protect ourselves by being judicious about their usage.

Image Courtesy: 

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Age & Eyes, What’s Common?

8 Jul

Last month, I was visiting my grandparents in Kolkata, and for the first time in so many years, my grandfather asked me to read him the morning papers. For someone who’s been very religious with his morning newspaper, it was sad for me to see him rely on someone else reading it out to him. Why? Because his eyes had become too weak. 

You see, my grandfather is a healthy man, and his eyes giving way like this got me thinking, and I decided to find out if age and eyes are connected. Sure enough, it turned out that age, indeed, was the cause of his weak eyesight!

 

The ageing process brings about changes that have a direct bearing on the eyesight. Not only do the eyes suffer directly, the increasing fragility, and susceptibility to other ailments, of the body are detriment to the eyes as well. Some of the more common signs of age-related eye problems that I found are: 

Floaters: These are small particles that float through your line of vision, and can be early signs of retinal detachment. One is, therefore, best advised to visit a doctor.

Excess Tears: No, not just because the elderly are more emotional! This is due to over-sensitivity to light, wind, or changes in temperature. 

Eyelid Irritations: Redness and swollen eyelids, itching, tearing, and crusting of eyelashes. 

Aside from these, I found that the loss of clear sight, which is what prevented my grandfather from reading his papers, was due to old eyes not having the power to focus – a condition medically referred to as Presbyopia.

 

Of course, I took my grandfather to an ophthalmologist, and and we got him prescription reading glasses, which have since allowed him to read his newspaper. But the sad truth remains that age and eyes are inextricably linked, and unfortunately, the health of the latter deteriorates with the gain of the former. So, when are you having an eye check-up of the elders of your family?

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