Tag Archives: cornea

An Eye for an Eye gives the whole world sight

30 Jan

15-Mar’12, 10:15pm

Today I visited my eye doctor; he said it might take approximately 6 more months for me to get my complete vision back in my right eye. It’s becoming difficult to see with my left eye.

19-Mar’12, 4:30am

I woke up suddenly because I had a dream where it was all dark and I couldn’t see anything. It startled and jolted me out of my sleep. I’m worried about my left eye, the vision is deteriorating. The doctor says it’s some corneal problem. Only replacing the cornea will bring back my vision. A similar thing happened in my right eye and I lost vision.

It all started 2 years ago. I was a happy-go-lucky person and enjoyed my school days. One day I was coming back from school and suddenly there was an explosion from a road side shop. Dirt and some sharp objects hit my face and few of them injured both my eyes.

I was taken to the hospital and treated. After a month I was left with partial vision in my left eye. The vision in my right eye was completely gone, due to an infection following the injury. Doctors gave me hope saying that replacing the cornea will bring back the vision in my right eye. But they also said that the vision in my left eye will gradually reduce with time. I rejoiced that the cornea can be replaced, but when I came to know that I have to wait for it, I wondered how long it would take to receive one.

25-Mar’12, 9:25pm

I inquired about eye donation. That’s when I learnt how it all works – they take the cornea of a person who has pledged his or her eyes. This can be done only after their death. I felt sad I have to wait for someone to die. It is sad that so many people die every day and their eyes cannot give some one sight if they haven’t pledged them.

15-Apr’12, 6:15am

Today I have to visit my doctor. I will know precisely when they will operate on my right eye. I’m tense and hope they don’t delay it further.

15-Apr’12, 9:45pm

The doctor said they would probably operate on my right eye in the first week of July. Now they receive more eye donations from people, as they are more aware of the need. Once I regain my vision, I will contribute some of my time and work for building awareness. Millions of people are blind and are waiting to regain their vision. If only everyone would pledge their eyes, there will not be anyone missing out on the beauty of nature and their independence.

30-Apr’12, 11:30pm

Now it’s become difficult for me read or write. I read one or two lines and my left eye starts paining.

15-May’12, 1:00pm

I visited my doctor today. The vision in my left eye has completely deteriorated.

25-Jun’12, 11:00am

I can’t resist writing. I can barely see my diary. I have to take my mother’s help. I’m tense, yet I look forward to the days after my surgery. I hope to read and write well and also be able to do everything on my own. I want to study and make a career, while leading a normal life, just as the others.

Image courtesy: staticflickr.com

Image courtesy: staticflickr.com

                                                                                                                                                                                                                  “Excerpts from the diary of a child”

How Computer Or Mobile Brightness Affect Vision

16 Nov

Our world has been transformed with the arrival of computers and mobile phones. Thanks to technological advancements, we live in a world where everything is easily accessible, faster, cheaper and quicker. Unfortunately, all this advancement has come at a cost, our health. And vision-related ill-effects from computers and mobile devices must be guarded against. 

So what exactly are the ill-effects of computers and mobile phones on our eyes and our vision? Let us take the computer to start with. Computers, their screens to be more specific, are made up of thousands of tiny pixels that are constantly moving. Our eyes in turn are not naturally able to set focus on these constantly moving pixels, and hence we try to focus on an area behind the actual screen. Therefore, in order to work on a computer, our eyes need to keep on fluctuating focus between their natural point of focus and the pixels on the screen. And this tires the eyes and causes a lot of wear and tear.

 

As a result, we suffer from irritation, which may range from a number of things like headaches, dry eyes, blurred vision, problems in focusing and faulty color perception, to something as severe as glaucoma. How does one avoid this? One must reduce the intensity of the computer’s screen by attaching a filter or by getting an eye-friendly screen. Above all, one must try to reduce the amount of computer usage or take frequent breaks. 

Similarly with mobile phones too, the eyes suffer the most from extended usage. The electromagnetic waves that are emitted by a mobile phone can be extremely damaging to the eyes. It has been studied and well documented that these cell phone waves can have a damaging effect on the various parts of the eye, including the retina and the cornea. Moreover, they can cause cataract too.

 

That is just the fall out from the waves of the cell phone. The cell phone screen itself has its own pitfalls that are similar to the ill-effects caused by computer screens. Only in this case, the strain is of a different kind because cell phone screens are much smaller than computer screens. So not only are the eyes dealing with the pixels, but are inherently stressing to be able to view content on a tiny screen too. 

The solution again is reduced usage. There is nothing more effective than controlling usage to reduce and negate the effects. To say that we can now lead our lives without computers and mobile devices would be a fallacy. But at least we can protect ourselves by being judicious about their usage.

Image Courtesy: 

Mobiles: http://bit.ly/t2dNcJ

Laptop: http://bit.ly/utiK2R 

Eye Donation – History

12 Oct

Introduction

If you are reading this, you consider yourself lucky to do this experiment.

Imagine closing your eyes and someone reading you these lines. How relaxing as you just enjoy listening without bothering to read or keeping your eyes open. You don’t mind doing this and enjoy it as you always knew that whenever you feel like you can open your eyes to read and enjoy the beauty of the world to see.

What if you can never open your eyes afterwards to see anything? You would never want to close your eyes for anything.

Feels scary? Hurt?

Imagine the fate of people waiting out there for someone who can bring back their vision by opening their eyes to see and enjoy the freedom of vision all over again.

Though restoring vision by donating your eyes is limited to treating corneal blindness alone, it has a greater impact when it comes to brightening an individual’s world of vision.

By donating your eyes you brighten the hopes of millions of people.

The History of Eye Donation

How it all Started

The Eye-Bank for Sight Restoration, the world’s first eye bank, is devoted to restoring sight through eye donations and cornea transplants

Some miracles just happen:

This pioneering agency which changed the lives of thousands and led the way for the whole field of transplantation, resulted from the brilliant partnership of an ophthalmologist Dr R. Townley Paton, M.D with a dream and a dynamic woman Mrs. Aida Breckinridge, a genius for motivating people.

The dream was to create a system that would allow people to pledge their eyes at death so that others, suffering from corneal blindness, could regain their sight.

As early as 1905, doctors had discovered that corneal blindness could be cured by replacing the damaged cornea with another clear human cornea.

A young ophthalmologist, R. Townley Paton, M.D., was convinced that cornea transplantation was a viable cure that could provide thousands of patients with visual redemption.

The Idea of an Eye Bank:

Dr. Paton had trained with the famous Dr. William Holland Wilmer at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. He later established his own practice in New York City and became affiliated with Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital.

There he began to perform cornea transplants with tissue he obtained privately. One source of tissue was prisoners on death row.

At the time, the death penalty was in practice, so Dr. Paton would make periodic visits to nearby Sing-Sing prison. With permission from proper authorities, he would obtain consent for donation from prisoners on death row and bring the donor tissue back to the hospital after a prisoner had been executed.

It may have been on one of these late night forays that Dr. Paton came to the brilliant conclusion that what was needed was a system for collecting eye donations, processing them and distributing them to doctors for transplant surgeries.

People could pledge their eyes in advance of their death, leaving a legacy of sight, just as they already made out their wills. He envisioned an eye bank.

The Organization is founded

Dr. Paton and a small group of doctors and laymen from surrounding institutions formed an organization on December 15, 1944 in a small room at Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital and laid the groundwork for The Eye-Bank for Sight Restoration.

They designed a plan in which eyes could be systematically obtained, preserved and redistributed to doctors who were performing cornea transplant operations. 

Thanks to an Inspirational Woman

To help implement the plan, Dr. Paton wisely solicited the help of Mrs. Aida Breckinridge, a known powerhouse for motivating people.

Mrs. Breckinridge had worked tirelessly to establish The Wilmer Institute which opened in 1929. And after that she led other causes including President Hoover’s Child Health Association.

Well-connected to society, business leaders and political figures of the time, Mrs. Breckinridge could wield the influence needed to popularize a unique idea. Plus, the thought of an agency to restore sight appealed to her because she herself suffered from glaucoma and was nearly blind.

Early Challenges

The eye bank was underway. But progress was not without its hurdles — some predictable, others unforeseen.

State regulators were put off from incorporating a bank that did not do financial transactions. With legal counsel, the problem was solved by inserting a hyphen into the phrase eye bank and adding further description, hence, The Eye-Bank for Sight Restoration, Inc., as it is called today.

There was no legal precedent for obtaining anatomical gifts. So laws had to be amended allowing any person to direct the manner in which his body should be disposed of after death.

Image Courtesy:

http://bit.ly/eyedonimg 


%d bloggers like this: